MCD

Look up mcd in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

MCD, Mcd or mcd may refer to:

Contents

1 Science

1.1 Medical

2 Technology

2.1 Computing

3 Transportation
4 Organisations
5 People
6 Other uses
7 See also

Science[edit]

Mesoscale convective discussion, a short-term technical forecast issued by the Storm Prediction Center
Magnetic circular dichroism, with polarized light
Millicandela (mcd) or Megacandela (Mcd), units of brightness or light intensity

Medical[edit]

Minimal change disease, a disease of the kidney
Multicentric Castleman’s disease, a sub-type of Castleman’s disease

Technology[edit]

Magnetic chip detector, an instrument used for detecting loose metallic particles in engines
Maxi single or Maxi single Compact Disc
Mini compact disc, a discographical release containing fewer songs than an EP
Mega CD, a console by Sega
Missile Countermeasure Device, a form of active protection system for military vehicles

Computing[edit]

.mcd, a Mathcad document file
.mcd, a file type used by Vectorworks software

Transportation[edit]

Merced station (Amtrak) (station code), California, US
Mackinac Island Airport (IATA airport code), in Michigan, US

Organisations[edit]

McDonald’s, an international restaurant chain
Municipal Corporation of Delhi
Melbourne College of Divinity
MCD Productions, an Irish event promoter

People[edit]

Michael Clarke Duncan (1957–2012), American actor

Other uses[edit]

Monument Class Description, a synthesis and summary of the archaeological evidence for a British ancient monument
1400 (Roman numerals)
Murder City Devils, a garage punk band from Seattle, US
Minor civil division, a geographical term used by the United States Census Bureau

See also[edit]

Measurement, Calibration and Diagnosis, with the Association for Standardisation of Automation and Measuring Systems

This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title MCD.
If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article.

Juan Falconi de Bustamante

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This article may be expanded with text translated from the corresponding article in Spanish. (August 2011) Click [show] for important translation instructions. 

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Juan Falconi de Bustamante (1596–1638) was a Spanish religious writer, theologist and ascetic.
Work[edit]

Primer to learn to read in Christ ( 1635 )
Primer second reading in Christ ( 1651 )
The Life of God (Letter to a daughter of confession, a private letter, written on 23 July 1628, which was released with the title added by editors in 1656)
The Sacred Monument ( 1657 )
Spiritual Works ( 1660 )
The day our daily bread on communion ( 1661 ) (Considered by some to be his major work)
Preparation of the mass.
Right Way to heaven.
How have to route all actions to God (disappeared).
Defense Commander before the Inquisition of F. Pedro Franco de Guzman.

This Spanish biographical article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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West End (Miami, Florida)

This article is an orphan, as no other articles link to it. Please introduce links to this page from related articles; try the Find link tool for suggestions. (June 2016)

The West End [1][2] is a wholly unincorporated area in suburban Miami-Dade County, Florida, United States. It is the collection of communities within and adjacent to County Commission District 11.[3] At the time of the 2010 census, there were 213,839 residents.

West End, Florida

Motto: Fun Families, Friendly Neighbors, Fit Residents

Location in Miami-Dade County and the state of Florida

Coordinates: 25°37′56″N 80°26′6″W / 25.63222°N 80.43500°W / 25.63222; -80.43500Coordinates: 25°37′56″N 80°26′6″W / 25.63222°N 80.43500°W / 25.63222; -80.43500

Country
 United States

State
 Florida

County
 Miami-Dade

Elevation
7 ft (2 m)

Population (2010)

 • Total
213,839

Time zone
Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)

 • Summer (DST)
EDT (UTC-4)

Contents

1 Geography
2 Demographics
3 Government and Infrastructure
4 Education

4.1 Elementary Schools
4.2 Middle Schools
4.3 High Schools
4.4 Academies
4.5 Universities

5 Institutions
6 Transportation
7 Places of Interest
8 National Parks
9 Innovation District
10 West End Living App
11 West End Community Image
12 Annual Events
13 References

Geography[edit]
The West End’s boundaries are the Florida Turnpike to the east, Southwest 152nd Street to the south, Krome Avenue to the west and Tamiami Trail (Southwest 8th Street) to the north. The area includes the census designated areas of The Hammocks, Country Walk, Kendall West, Kendale Lakes, Three Lakes, The Crossings and Tamiami.
Demographics[edit]
In 2015 Commissioner Juan C. Zapata submitted a report called “West End Strategy: A Vision for the Future”,[4] which stated that West End residents account for 8.6% of Miami-Dade County’s population. It is the second most populous district behind Commission District 9. The West End had a 20.4% growth from 2000 to 2010. It has an annual growth rate of 0.9%. Since 2011, there has been an increase in new residents who have immigrated to the West End from abroad. The area has the lowest overall poverty rate of all districts in Miami-Dade County. Only 7.7% of the West End population lives below poverty level. This number has been decreasing since 2000.[5] The West End also enjoys a low crime rate.

The newly painted West District Police Station which se

Acrosin

Acrosin

Identifiers

EC number
3.4.21.10

CAS number
9068-57-9

Databases

IntEnz
IntEnz view

BRENDA
BRENDA entry

ExPASy
NiceZyme view

KEGG
KEGG entry

MetaCyc
metabolic pathway

PRIAM
profile

PDB structures
RCSB PDB PDBe PDBsum

Gene Ontology
AmiGO / EGO

Search

PMC
articles

PubMed
articles

NCBI
proteins

Acrosin is a digestive enzyme that acts as a protease. In humans, acrosin is encoded by the ACR gene.[1][2] Acrosin is released from the acrosome of spermatozoa as a consequence of the acrosome reaction. It aids in the penetration of the Zona Pellucida.

Contents

1 Enzyme Mechanism
2 Biological Function
3 Structure
4 Disease and Pharmaceutical Relevance
5 References
6 Further reading
7 External links

Enzyme Mechanism[edit]
Acrosin is a typical serine proteinase with trypsin-like specificity.[3]

Acrosin catalytic mechanism

The reaction proceeds according to the usual serine protease mechanism. First, His-57 deprotonates Ser-195, allowing it to serve as a nucleophile. Deprotonated Ser-195 then reacts with the carbonyl carbon of a peptide, forming a tetrahedral intermediate. The tetrahedral intermediate then collapses, resulting in an H2N-R1 leaving group, which is protonated through His-57. Finally, His-57 deprotonates a water molecule, which can then serve as a nucleophile by similarly reacting with the carbonyl carbon. Collapse of the tetrahedral intermediate then results in a Ser-195 leaving group, which is protonated through His-57, resulting in all residues returned to their pre-catalytic state, and a carboxylic acid where there was previously a peptide bond.
Biological Function[edit]
Acrosin is the major proteinase present in the acrosome of mature spermatozoa. It is stored in the acrosome in its precursor form, proacrosin. Upon stimulus, the acrosome releases its contents onto the zona pellucida. After this reaction occurs, the zymogen form of the protease is then processed into its active form, β-acrosin. The active enzyme then functions in the lysis of the zona pellucida, thus facilitating penetration of the sperm through the innermost glycoprotein layers of the ovum.[3]
The importance of acrosin in the acrosome reaction has been contested. It has been found through genetic knockout experiments that mouse spermatozoa lacking β-acrosin (the active protease) still have the ability to penetrate the zona pellucida.[4] Thus, some argue for its role in assisting in the dispersal of acrosomal contents fo
분당오피

Herpetogramma

Herpetogramma

Herpetogramma fluctuosalis (Lederer, 1863)

Scientific classification

Kingdom:
Animalia

Phylum:
Arthropoda

Class:
Insecta

Order:
Lepidoptera

Family:
Crambidae

Subfamily:
Spilomelinae

Genus:
Herpetogramma
Lederer, 1863[1]

Synonyms

Acharana Moore, 1885
Coremataria Amsel, 1956
Culcitaria Amsel, 1957
Macrobotys Munroe, 1950
Pachyzancla Meyrick, 1884
Pantoeocome Warren, 1896
Piloptila Swinhoe, 1894
Ptiloptila Hampson, 1899
Stenomelas Hampson, 1912
Stenomeles Warren, 1892

Herpetogramma is a genus of moths of the Crambidae family.
Species[edit]

Herpetogramma abdominalis (Zeller, 1872)
Herpetogramma acyptera (Hampson, 1899)
Herpetogramma aeglealis (Walker, 1859)
Herpetogramma agavealis (Walker, 1859)
Herpetogramma albicilia (Hampson, 1913)
Herpetogramma albipennis Inoue, 2000
Herpetogramma albivitta (Hampson, 1913)
Herpetogramma amselalis Munroe, 1995
Herpetogramma antillalis (Schaus, 1920)
Herpetogramma atrirenalis (Hampson, 1912)
Herpetogramma atropunctalis (Mabille, 1900)
Herpetogramma barbipalpalis (Hampson, 1918)
Herpetogramma basalis (Walker, 1866)
Herpetogramma bermudalis (Dyar, 1915)
Herpetogramma bipunctalis (Fabricius, 1794)
Herpetogramma brunnealis (Hampson, 1913)
Herpetogramma centrostrigalis (Stephens, 1934)
Herpetogramma cervinicosta (Hampson, 1918)
Herpetogramma circumflexalis Guenée, 1854
Herpetogramma cleoropa (Meyrick, 1934)
Herpetogramma continualis J. C. Shaffer & Munroe, 2007
Herpetogramma coptobasalis (Hampson, 1899)
Herpetogramma cora (Dyar, 1914)
Herpetogramma couteneyi Guillermet, 2008
Herpetogramma cynaralis (Walker, 1859)
Herpetogramma debressyi Guillermet, 2008
Herpetogramma decora (Dyar, 1914)
Herpetogramma desmioides (Hampson, 1899)
Herpetogramma dilatatipes (Walker, 1866)
Herpetogramma elongalis (Warren, 1892)
Herpetogramma emphatica (Dyar, 1926)
Herpetogramma exculta (T. P. Lucas, 1892)
Herpetogramma fascinalis (Amsel, 1950)
Herpetogramma fimbrialis (Dognin, 1904)
Herpetogramma fluctuosalis (Lederer, 1863)
Herpetogramma fuscescens (Warren, 1892)
Herpetogramma gnamptoceralis (Hampson, 1917)
Herpetogramma grisealis (Snellen, 1875)
Herpetogramma griseolineata (Mabille, 1900)
Herpetogramma hipponalis (Walker, 1859)
Herpetogramma hirsuta (Dognin, 1903)
Herpetogramma holochrysis (Hampson, 1913)
Herpetogramma holophaea (Hampson, 1899)
Herpetogramma hoozana (Strand, 1918)
Herpetogramma infuscalis (Guenée, 1854)
Herpetogramma innotalis (Hampson, 1899)
Herpetogramma juba J. C. Shaffer &am
수원오피

William Maule (rower)

William Maule (1824- 16 May 1898) was an English clergyman and rower who won the Diamond Challenge Sculls at Henley Royal Regatta in 1847.
Maule was born in London, the third son of George Maule, Treasury Solicitor. He was educated at Winchester College and Trinity College, Cambridge.[1] He was president of Cambridge University Boat Club and in 1847 rowed bow against Oxford in the Grand Challenge Cup at Henley in a year when there was no official Boat Race. He also won the Diamond Challenge Sculls at Henley in 1847, beating the previous year’s winner Edward Moon.[2] Moon had the compensation of being bow opposite Maule in the winning Oxford boat in the Grand Challenge Cup that year.[3]
Maule was ordained deacon (Ely) in 1849 and priest in 1850. He was curate of Fletton, Huntingdonshire from 1849 to 1850 and of Church Crookham, Hampshire from 1850 to 1851. In 1851 he became rector of Eynesbury, Huntingdonshire and was Rural Dean of St Neots from 1876 to 1889. In 1890 he became vicar of Privett, Hampshire until his death there at the age of 74.
Maule married Cecil Vardon, youngest daughter of Thomas Vardon on 17 July 1851.
References[edit]

^ “Maule, William (ML844W)”. A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge. 
^ Henley Royal Regatta Results of Final Races 1839-1939
^ W E Sherwood Oxford Rowing 2009

부산오피

USS Callao (IX-205)

For other ships going by the same name, see USS Callao.

Externsteine after being captured by USCGC Eastwind

History

Nazi Germany

Name:
Externsteine

Namesake:
The Externsteine rock formation

Owner:
Kriegsmarine

Builder:
P. Smit Jr., Rotterdam, Netherlands

Yard number:
570

Laid down:
1943

Launched:
1944

Commissioned:
1944

Identification:
WBS 11

Captured:
16 October 1944

Fate:
Captured by United States Coast Guard

United States

Name:
USCGC East Breeze

Owner:
United States Coast Guard

Commissioned:
16 October 1944

Decommissioned:
December 1944

Fate:
Transferred to United States Navy

United States

Name:
USS Callao

Namesake:
Callao, Peru

Owner:
United States Navy

Commissioned:
24 January 1945

Decommissioned:
10 May 1950

Identification:
IX-205

Fate:
Sold for scrapping, broken up in 1951

General characteristics

Displacement:
1,015 tons

Length:
183 ft (55.78 m)

Beam:
30 ft 10 in (9.40 m)

Draught:
13 ft 11 in (4.24 m)

Installed power:
Triple expansion steam engine with exhaust turbine, 750 shp

Propulsion:
Screw propeller

Speed:
10 knots (19 km/h)

Complement:

30 (Externsteine)
78 (Callao)

Armament:
2-cm automatic cannon[1]

USS Callao (IX-205), an unclassified miscellaneous vessel, was the third ship of the United States Navy to be named for Callao, a seaport in Peru. She was built for the Kriegsmarine as the weather ship and icebreaker Externsteine. The ship was captured on 16 October 1944 by USCGC Eastwind and was temporarily commissioned into the United States Coast Guard as USCGC East Breeze before being turned over to the United States Navy and commissioned as USS Callao in January 1945. The ship was sold out of service in 1950, and broken up the following year.

Contents

1 Description
2 History
3 Notes
4 References
5 Sources

Description[edit]
The ship was 183 feet (55.78 m) long, with a beam of 30 feet 10 inches (9.40 m) and a draught of 13 feet 11 inches (4.24 m). She had a displacement of 1,015 tons. She was powered by a 750 shp triple expansion steam engine with an exhaust turbine driving a single screw propeller, which could propel her at 10 knots (19 km/h).[2][3]
History[edit]
The ship was built in 1943–44 as yard number 570 by P. Smit, Jr. Shipyard, Rotterdam, South Holland, Netherlands. Originally intended to be the trawler Mannheim for the Nordsee Deutsche Hochseefischerei,
수원오피

Charles Lucas (cricketer, born 1853)

Charles James Lucas (25 February 1853 – 17 April 1928) was an English cricketer active from 1876 to 1882 who played for Middlesex and Sussex. He was born in Clapham Common and died in Pimlico. He appeared in twelve first-class matches as a righthanded batsman who bowled roundarm right arm fast. He scored 237 runs with a highest score of 38 and took seven wickets with a best performance of three for 17.[1]
Notes[edit]

^ Charles Lucas at CricketArchive

This biographical article related to an English cricket person born in the 1850s is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Sylph (1831 ship)

This article is about the ship. For other uses, see Sylph (disambiguation).

The opium clipper Sylph salvaged by the sloop Clive, William John Huggins, in the National Maritime Museum

History

Name:
Sylph

Namesake:
Mythological creature in Western tradition, the Sylph

Owner:
Rustomjee Cowasjee

Builder:
Currie & Co., Sulkea, Calcutta[1]

Launched:
1831[1]

Acquired:
Jardine Matheson, 1833

In service:
1832

Out of service:
1849

Homeport:
Hong Kong

Fate:
Disappeared en route to Singapore, 1849

General characteristics

Class and type:
Opium clipper

Tons burthen:
304 (bm)

Length:
Hull, 100 ft (30.48 m)

Propulsion:
Sails

Complement:
Crew of 70

Sylph was a clipper ship built in Calcutta in 1831 for the Parsi merchant Rustomjee Cowasjee.[2] After her purchase by the Hong Kong based merchant house Jardine Matheson, in 1833 Sylph went on to set an unbroken speed record by sailing from Calcutta to Macao in 17 days, 17 hours.[2][3] Her primary role was to transport opium between various ports in the Far East.[4] Two contemporary paintings of Sylph show her to have been a heavily rigged ship with trysails on each mast and a tall, high-peaked spanker.[2]

Contents

1 History
2 Notes
3 References
4 Further reading

History[edit]
Sylph was designed in London by Sir Robert Seppings, surveyor of the Royal Navy, to the order of a consortium of Calcutta merchants headed by Rustomjee Cowasjee. Sleek, elegant, functional and devoid of ornament, Sylph did not have the rakish lines of the later clippers, yet proved to be particularly swift.[5] She is supposed to have run from the Sandheads to Macao in sixteen days.[6]
In 1833 Jardines sent Sylph to explore the profitability of trading along the Chinese coast. Arriving at Macao in September, Sylph unloaded some of the opium she had transported from Calcutta and immediately departed northwards with the German Protestant missionary Karl Gützlaff on board as translator.[7] During the First Opium War (1839–1842) Jardines were offered a premium price for the ship, an offer that was declined on the basis of the huge profits she made from transporting opium.
Sylph and another well-known clipper, Cowasjee Family, were fitted out with extra guns and full European crews during the war, and were joined by the Lady Hayes, belonging to Jardine, Matheson & Co., the three ships sailing in company. While they were sailing among the islands Chinese war junks surrounded them and a fierc

Horana Divisional Secretariat

Horana Divisional Secretariat

Divisional Secretariat

Country
 Sri Lanka

Province
Western Province

District
Kalutara District

Time zone
Sri Lanka Standard Time (UTC+5:30)

Horana Divisional Secretariat is a Divisional Secretariat of Kalutara District, of Western Province, Sri Lanka.
References[edit]

Divisional Secretariats Portal

This Western Province, Sri Lanka location article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Divisional Secretariats of Kalutara District.

Agalawatta Divisional Secretariat
Bandaragama Divisional Secretariat
Beruwala Divisional Secretariat
Bulathsinhala Divisional Secretariat
Dodangoda Divisional Secretariat
Horana Divisional Secretariat
Ingiriya Divisional Secretariat
Kalutara Divisional Secretariat
Madurawela Divisional Secretariat
Mathugama Divisional Secretariat
Millaniya Divisional Secretariat
Palindanuwara Divisional Secretariat
Panadura Divisional Secretariat
Walallavita Divisional Secretariat

Template:Divisional Secretariats of Sri Lanka